DCSIMG

Everyday history told in postcards from the past

MCHG 12-1032   Mary Casserley has a new book out featuring old postcard images of Berkhamsted.

MCHG 12-1032 Mary Casserley has a new book out featuring old postcard images of Berkhamsted.

These are just some of the early 20th century postcards that feature in the new book by self-confessed hoarder Mary Casserley.

Her book, Postcards of Berkhamsted 1902-1945, includes people’s messages to each other on the back of the postcards, giving ‘tidbits’ of detail on the period’s social history.

Mary, 41, of Westfield Road, Berkhamsted, said: “It is a collection of postcards that my family have handed down, because we have been in the the town since about 1890.

“I am not a collector – I am just a hoarder. Local history is my hobby and I thought anyone should be able to see them. I have got over 400.”

The postcards in her book feature ancient scenes from the town and show its landmarks – which include Berkhamsted School and Berkhamsted Castle.

Postcards were sent much more regularly in the early 20th century and were commonly used by friends to communicate with each other – they were the text messages of their day.

Mary said: “In those days it was a brand new method of communicating and everybody used them. I have got one sent at 3.45pm and it says: ‘Meet me at 7pm.’

“People used them to place orders to buy things as well. They wrote in a very peculiar manner – very formal.

“I think there is a lot of beauty on the back of the messages.

“People write all sorts of peculiar, bizarre things, which are little titbits of everyday life.”

One begins with the sentence: ‘A carer died and was fished out of the canal today.’

To read more of them, her book can be bought for £20 from Berkhamsted’s The Way Inn bookshop and Waterstones.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page