Metal detectorist is quids over rare coin find

The most recent example of the Tring Wheel, of which there are only 10 in the world
The most recent example of the Tring Wheel, of which there are only 10 in the world

A rare Iron Age coin called the Tring Wheel is being sold at auction this month with an opening bid of £2,000.

Ancient British coin specialist Chris Rudd, of Celtic Coins, will be auctioning the find on behalf of the woman metal detectorist who discovered it in Caistor, Lincolnshire.

The first known example of the tiny gold coin was discovered in a field on the outskirts of Tring – hence the name – and it is so rare that not even the British Museum has one in its collection.

Coin expert Mr Rudd said: “The Tring Wheel would have been minted around the time of Julius Caesar’s invasion in 55-54BC.

“On one side you have the head of the sun God, Apollo, and on the other you have a powerful horse and chariot.”

In 20 years of trading, Celtic Coins has never dealt with a Tring Wheel before and only nine other examples are known of in the entire world.

Chris is even more excited because this most recent find has been hailed as the best example ever discovered.

He said: “Gold is a soft, malleable metal and usually these coins get dented and scratched when the farmers plough the soil.

“This example has barely any marks on it so we believe it must have been buried quite some way below the surface for some time.”

Mr Rudd expects this particular Tring Wheel gold quarter stater – which measures 14mm across and weighs 1.3g – to fetch up to £4,000 in the auction in Aylsham, Norfolk on November 10.

For more information, visit www.celticcoins.co.uk.