World’s best wildlife photos will be showcased in top exhibition

People's Choice winner Facebook Update by Marsel van Oosten (above) and the overall winner The Last Great Picture by Michael 'Nick' Nichols (below)
People's Choice winner Facebook Update by Marsel van Oosten (above) and the overall winner The Last Great Picture by Michael 'Nick' Nichols (below)

Some of the planet’s finest pictures of animals will go on show when the world-renowned Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition comes to the Natural History Museum at Tring next week.

The acclaimed exhibition, which is also celebrating its landmark 50th year, promises to ‘showcase the rich array of life on our planet, reflecting its beauty and also highlighting its fragility’.

A collection of more than 100 images combines the work of talented young photographers, gifted amateurs and leading professionals who were all selected for their ‘creativity, artistry and technical complexity’.

Head of the Natural History Museum at Tring, Paul Kitching, says he is delighted to welcome the exhibition back to the town as it is a firm favourite with visitors and staff alike.

“I’m always amazed by the quality and diversity of images on display,” Mr Kitching said.

Winners of the grand titles in this year’s milestone competition were announced at an awards ceremony at the Natural History Museum.

American photographer Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols was named Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 by a panel of international judges for his serene black-and-white image of lions resting with their cubs in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park.

Following the pride for nearly six months meant they were used to his presence as he photographed them in infra-red, which he explains, ‘transforms the light and turns the moment into something primal, biblical almost’.

Jim Brandenburg, chair of the judging panel and acclaimed wildlife photographer, said: “Nick’s image encapsulated so many elements that demonstrated artistic and technical skill, the sort that takes many years of professional work to hone and craft as he has done.”

Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 Carlos Perez Naval’s image of a scorpion soaking up the sun – Stinger in the Sun – will also be on show as will Marsel van Oosten’s brilliant picture of a Japanese macaque examining his prize after snatching a tourist’s mobile phone.

The free exhibition, which is co-owned by the Natural History Museum and BBC Worldwide, opens next Saturday (November 29).

It will runs until March 8 2015, Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm and Sundays from 2pm until 5pm before embarking on a UK and international tour.

For more info visit www.nhm.ac.uk/wildphoto or call the museum on 020 7942 6171.